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#31 ~ Falling Angels

Falling Angels by Tracy Chevalier

This novel is setup in a compelling way. The story is told through the point of view of eleven (+/-) narrators. You have to delve into the agenda of each character in order to determine what really is happening and why Those agendas are prone to change as the character matures or makes life altering decisions. It took no time to get engrossed in the story and I can’t tell you how many times I skimmed through the pages to come in search of the next entry by one narrator or another.

The story revolves around two families roughly in the same socio-economic class, but with Maude’s family slightly higher than Lavinia’s. It is the shared love of the cemetery that brings these young girls together in friendship, much to the chagrin of their mothers. Maude’s mother, Kitty Coleman, is an educated woman who is disappointed in what life has to hold for her has caused her to neglect those in her life who love her. She feels that her life would be so much more had she not been required to get married. Lavinia’s mother, Gertrude Waterhouse, invests all too much of herself in her role as wife and mother. She would be no one if she did not have a husband, child, or house to care for. As time goes on, each mother is secretly grateful for the presence of the other child in their daughter’s life. Lavinia has all the flare and lust for life that Kitty wishes Maude had. Maude is down to earth and more reserved, the way that Gertrude wishes Lavinia was.

As they move toward adolescence, the cemetery is no longer enough to maintain the friendship. In fact, even the reasons why each girl enjoys going there separates them. Lavinia is ecstatic when an aunt passes away because it gives her the opportunity to practice and embrace the societal standards for mourning. Maude has no interest whatsoever in mourning traditions. Her interest in visiting the cemetery is practical. She wants to learn the ins and outs of burial and, most controversially, cremation. Maude becomes weary of Lavinia’s drama and conversely, Lavinia becomes bored with Maude’s practicality. As the girls’ friendship comes to a cross roads, Kitty becomes fully involved in the women’s suffrage movement, pulling the girls and both families in with her. Their involvement in the historic suffrage march in London changes all of their forever.

In the end, I found the build up much more intense and interesting than the conclusion. Still, I enjoyed reading it. Even the most beautiful jigsaw puzzle is far more fun to put together than it is to look at.

5 Comments

  • At 2007.07.01 11:02, Kim.Kim said:

    I always see Girl With a Pearl Earing in the dvd rental shop but never borrow it, have you seen it?

    I know, this blog is about books,……

    • At 2007.07.01 13:49, Literate Housewife said:

      I actually haven’t seen the movie, although I adore Scarlett Johannson. If you rent it, you must let me know what you think.

      And, books and movies often intersect anyway. I enjoy talking and writing about both. Next year I’ll have to do 52 Books and Movies or Bust… or maybe not. I’d lose my eyes for sure.

      • At 2007.07.01 16:03, DD said:

        During my vacation I read two books: Veil of Roses (so-so, but interesting because of it’s presentation of Pershian culture), and Water for Elephants, which I totally loved.

        • At 2007.07.06 17:17, Literate Housewife said:

          DD,

          I am definitely adding Water for Elephants to my reading list!

          • At 2012.09.26 07:00, #475 ~ The Unseen said:

            […] happened. Elements of Katherine Webb’s storytelling reminded me of Tracy Chevalier, especially Falling Angels. Despite my lukewarm feelings toward the modern day angle in the book, I loved reading The Unseen. […]

            (Required)
            (Required, will not be published)

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